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Tag Archives: LightSquared

When NTIA and FCC Pull the Plug on LightSquared, Will it Dim Sprint’s Network Vision?

What began as such a promising idea for a $7 billion nationwide broadband wireless network with 40,000 antenna sites may not receive the regulatory approval it needs to move forward. In a letter sent on Wednesday, The National Telecommunications and Information Administration updated the FCC on its latest independent evaluation of the negative impact of LightSquared on GPS services.

“We conclude that the LightSquared mobile broadband network will impact GPS services and there is no practical way to mitigate the potential interference at this time,” wrote Lawrence Strickling, NTIA assistant secretary for communications and information.

Last July, LightSquared entered into an agreement with Sprint where it promised to pay the carrier $9 billion to deploy its nationwide LTE network over the Network Vision infrastructure and would have received credits valued at $4.5 billion. In October, Sprint accelerated deployment of Network Vision, which consolidates multiple network technologies into one seamless network. The demise of LightSquared leaves Sprint’s pocketbook quite a bit lighter and its spectrum-hosting business without an anchor tenant.

The FCC’s International Bureau, which had issued a conditional waiver order prohibiting LightSquared from operating until harmful interference issues were resolved, immediately released a statement that appeared to bow to the will of the NTIA.

“The NTIA, the federal agency that coordinates spectrum uses for the military and other federal government entities, has now concluded that there is no practical way to mitigate potential interference at this time. Consequently, the commission will not lift the prohibition on LightSquared,” said FCC spokesperson Tammy Sun.

The FCC is releasing this week a Public Notice seeking comment on the NTIA’s conclusions, proposing to vacate the conditional waiver order and suspend indefinitely LightSquared’s ancillary terrestrial component authority.

The FCC faced monumental challenges in attempting to allow terrestrial mobile communications on the satellite spectrum. Especially frustrating for the commission were the GPS receivers that pick up signals from uses in adjacent bands.

“There are very substantial costs to our economy and to consumers of preventing the use of this and other spectrum for mobile broadband,” Sun said. “Congress, the FCC, other federal agencies and private sector stakeholders must work together in a concerted effort to reduce regulatory barriers and free up spectrum for mobile broadband.” She called for better receiver performance standards as a way to more efficiently use spectrum.

Federal agencies decided earlier this week that they will develop new GPS spectrum interference standards for future proposals for non-space commercial uses of adjacent bands.

“NTIA recognizes the importance that receiver standards could play as a part of a forward-looking model for spectrum management even beyond the immediate use of GPS,” Strickling wrote.

In a sure sign that the end is nigh, Bloomberg Businessweek reports that Phil Falcone, whose hedge fund Harbinger Capital Partners invested $3 billion in LightSquared, is attempting to swap the spectrum, valued at $500 million by Skyterra, with the U.S. Department of Defense to salvage some of his investment. Since its subprime loan investments paid off handsomely five years ago, Harbinger’s capital has dropped from $26 billion to $4 billion.

When NTIA and FCC Pull the Plug on LightSquared, Will it Dim Sprint’s Network Vision?

What began as such a promising idea for a $7 billion nationwide broadband wireless network with 40,000 antenna sites may not receive the regulatory approval it needs to move forward. In a letter sent on Wednesday, The National Telecommunications and Information Administration updated the FCC on its latest independent evaluation of the negative impact of LightSquared on GPS services.

“We conclude that the LightSquared mobile broadband network will impact GPS services and there is no practical way to mitigate the potential interference at this time,” wrote Lawrence Strickling, NTIA assistant secretary for communications and information.

Last July, LightSquared entered into an agreement with Sprint where it promised to pay the carrier $9 billion to deploy its nationwide LTE network over the Network Vision infrastructure and would have received credits valued at $4.5 billion. In October, Sprint accelerated deployment of Network Vision, which consolidates multiple network technologies into one seamless network. The demise of LightSquared leaves Sprint’s pocketbook quite a bit lighter and its spectrum-hosting business without an anchor tenant.

The FCC’s International Bureau, which had issued a conditional waiver order prohibiting LightSquared from operating until harmful interference issues were resolved, immediately released a statement that appeared to bow to the will of the NTIA.

“The NTIA, the federal agency that coordinates spectrum uses for the military and other federal government entities, has now concluded that there is no practical way to mitigate potential interference at this time. Consequently, the commission will not lift the prohibition on LightSquared,” said FCC spokesperson Tammy Sun.

The FCC is releasing this week a Public Notice seeking comment on the NTIA’s conclusions, proposing to vacate the conditional waiver order and suspend indefinitely LightSquared’s ancillary terrestrial component authority.

The FCC faced monumental challenges in attempting to allow terrestrial mobile communications on the satellite spectrum. Especially frustrating for the commission were the GPS receivers that pick up signals from uses in adjacent bands.

“There are very substantial costs to our economy and to consumers of preventing the use of this and other spectrum for mobile broadband,” Sun said. “Congress, the FCC, other federal agencies and private sector stakeholders must work together in a concerted effort to reduce regulatory barriers and free up spectrum for mobile broadband.” She called for better receiver performance standards as a way to more efficiently use spectrum.

Federal agencies decided earlier this week that they will develop new GPS spectrum interference standards for future proposals for non-space commercial uses of adjacent bands.

“NTIA recognizes the importance that receiver standards could play as a part of a forward-looking model for spectrum management even beyond the immediate use of GPS,” Strickling wrote.

In a sure sign that the end is nigh, Bloomberg Businessweek reports that Phil Falcone, whose hedge fund Harbinger Capital Partners invested $3 billion in LightSquared, is attempting to swap the spectrum, valued at $500 million by Skyterra, with the U.S. Department of Defense to salvage some of his investment. Since its subprime loan investments paid off handsomely five years ago, Harbinger’s capital has dropped from $26 billion to $4 billion.

Washington Politics Collide with LightSquared Proceeding

Possibly the worst thing that can happen to an FCC proceeding is for Congress to get involved. A little more than a week after LightSquared met with FCC officials to discuss its latest proposal to mitigate interference with GPS units, a congressional hearing, “Sustaining GPS for National Security,” held on Sept. 15, threatened to descend the proceeding into political rancor.

Perhaps emboldened by the hoopla surrounding Obama-favorite Solyndra’s high profile bankruptcy, Republicans sensed blood in the water when it came to light that the White House had attempted to alter General William Shelton’s congressional testimony on LightSquared’s impact on military GPS.

On Sept. 15, Rep. Michael Turner (R-Ohio) and chairman of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, accused the White House of moving in favor of LightSquared because of campaign contributions made by its owner, Phillip Falcone.

“We cannot afford to have federal telecommunications policy, especially where it affects national security, be made in the same way that the White House has parceled out a half billion dollars in loan guarantees to the failed Solyndra, a large political campaign contributor of the president,” Turner said in an interview with John King at Real Clear Politics, a conservative web site.

As a result, the Twittersphere was abuzz with references to stories such as the one on the Daily Beast’s web site with the headline, “White House Pressure for a Donor?”

“The Pentagon has worried for months that a project backed by a prominent Democratic donor might interfere with military GPS. Now Congress wants to know if the White House pressured a general to change his testimony,” led the story in the Daily Beast.

Sanjiv Ahuja, chairman and CEO of LightSquared, denied that his company had benefited from political connections, saying that LightSquared’s founder has given to both parties and two-thirds of those donations have gone to Republicans. He added that regulators from both parties have supported LightSquared’s efforts.

“Any suggestion that LightSquared has run roughshod over the regulatory process is contradicted by the reality of eight long years spent gaining approvals. Just this week, there has been another request from the government for an additional round of testing of LightSquared’s network,” Ahuja said.

Another sideshow at the hearing occurred when FCC Chairman Genachowski decided not to show up to testify. Rep. Turner opined that his absence was an “affront” to the subcommittee.

“Personally, I feel this is an absolute effort by the Chairman to avoid the oversight questions and to avoid the issue of how [LightSquared] will affect GPS and how the FCC’s processes appear to be irregular on how this matter is moving forward,” Turner told the hearing.

LightSquared Continues to Craft a Technical Solution

Back on Sept. 6, LightSquared met with FCC officials to discuss the technical aspects of its latest proposal to ensure operational compatibility between its terrestrial wireless technology and GPS units.

LightSquared’s latest plans limit power to no more than -30 dBm at points on the ground. Power would be increased to -27 dBm after January 1, 2015 and then to -24 dBm after January 1, 2017.

The carrier said it would provide a long term, stable satellite signal for MSS-provided GPS at frequencies near the top of the MSS Downlink Band, 1555 MHz to 1559 MHz.

Measurements will be performed at distances starting 50 meters from the base of the antenna on the 10 megahertz centered at 1531 MHz.

LightSquared discussed using narrowband high-rejection filtering in the GPS timing reference antennas and amplifiers as part of a mitigation solution.

“Filter technologies exist to protect wideband GPS receivers from LightSquared LTE signals in the 1526 MHz to 1536 MHz band and is realizable without compensation techniques,” LightSquared said. The timing receiver mitigation solution works with all narrowband timing receivers configured with separate, external antenna, LightSquared said.

On Sept. 13, the FCC issued a Public Notice stating that while LightSquared had made progress in mitigating GPS interference, but concerns still remained and further testing was necessary. LightSquared originally revised its deployment plan on June 30 to operate terrestrial transmitters only in the lower 10 megahertz of its spectrum.

“The results thus far from the testing, using the lower 10 megahertz, showed significant improvement compared to tests of the upper 10 megahertz, although there continue to be interference concerns for certain types of high precision GPS receivers, including devices used in national security and aviation applications. Additional tests are therefore necessary,” according to the FCC.